All hail Terence Mckenna for leading the way

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/12/science/12psychedelics.html?src=me&ref=homepage

A positive article in the NYtimes about psilocybin and its possible benefits for those suffering from deep depression and other psychological ailments. A somewhat unexpected article on the long “tabooed” fungi species. It doesn’t surprise me that it shows up as one of the most emailed articles on the site.

I believe it’s all leading up to a sort of medical revolution, where we collectively start to move away from big Pharma (mostly for the cost) but consider tried and true remedies that have only been held back by Big Media. Well, now that a complete fragmentation of opinion and thought is occurring through the web, the objective truth about these “mystical realities” can be further revealed.

“Are you experienced? Have you ever been experienced?”

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Alcohol consumption/easy living of the 60s (via Mad Men) not so bad?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/01/health/research/01aging.html?_r=1&em

This comes from the NYtimes most emailed section. It’s a brief story about the effects of moderate alcohol consumption, as it pertains to people over 60.

The analysis, which appeared in the July issue of The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, reviewed 15 studies that together followed more than 28,000 subjects for at least two years. All the studies controlled for age, sex, smoking and other factors. The studies variously defined light to moderate drinking as 1 to 28 drinks per week.

“Light to moderate drinking as 1 to 28 drinks per week.” This sounds a bit too vague to me. I’m not a big fan of these drinking stories that pop up every once in a while. Although maybe it’s possible that drinking along with marijuana has always just been viewed in a taboo way, never allowing the research of the day to make it to the consumer. Now that more studies are being conducted, or the fact that we’re becoming a more scientific people and less superstitious, the dough may start to rise on certain issues.

That or companies like MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch are raising prices this fall. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32557991/

I’ve been watching a lot of Mad men lately, so it’s interesting to think of a planted news story as a kind of an advertisement. However this is another post all together. The fact that most people turn a blind eye to ALL ads now, regardless of how attractive they are. So what’s better than infiltrating the dying news business with stories that will make you gravitate towards a particular commodity or product in a less than obvious way?