The Reflective part of our collective history.

We are in the throes of the reflection. Can’t you feel it? Remakes of movies, 70s, 80s, 90s cover bands, and anything else that can be sold as nostalgia – is being sold at an alarming rate. So are we done creating as a collective species? Have we imagined every 3D scenario worth imaging? Our Facebook profiles synthesize our lives in such a precise and border bound way, that we are able to meticulously reflect our inner lives in an accessible outer way. We are able to cast out our own approved reflection to the world. Comic book movies reflect how a director/producer/writer now see the comic book heroes of their youth, on the big screen, with relevant actors of our time, and planting topical thoughts on our current government/economy/media culture. It does feel that through technology and access to information, we’re at a point we’re we can take several steps back and really start to deconstruct our collective history. As if “pre-internet” was more about the pure act of creating in the dark, taking chances on style, music, and expression. Now we’re all able to pick and choose from the sea of media at our fingertips and assimilate exactly what we want into our current mode of living. It’s a refinement phase, where we realize that in a sense there’s nothing left to create, and we’re only interested in duplicating that which is most appealing to our own sensibilities.

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The podcast evolution also plays along with this idea of reflection and deconstruction. Comics deconstructing society and their own lives, sometimes up to 2-3 hours on a weekly basis. The listener is able to listen in on these comics own form of self-therapy and maybe gain some insight into their own lives. (Joe Rogan, Duncan Trussell, Danielle Bolelli, Marc Maron, and Chelsea Peretti are a few that come to mind.) It’s the moving away from scripted entertainment, towards less fabricated laughs, and more of “the real” as “the real” stands somewhat threatened in the light of computers making everything feel so fabricated and precise in our daily lives. Podcasts preserve “the real” as we assimilate more and more into the beginning stages of The Singularity. In my mind, The Singularity, which was first proposed by Ray Kurzweil, is all about bringing the world together as a collective government, economy, and media outlet. It feels quite threatening to some of us, because a large part of our psyche is still tribal and still bound to an older biblical sense of ownership over other humans and land. As resources become more finite and populations expand, this idea of nations living and dying off by themselves will become more apparent. You already see it with the paradigm of dictators being exposed and the idea of one ruler getting away with whatever they want, simply not being able to persist as the rampant availability of cameras/social media forces us as a collective to start figuring out what the collective rights/wrongs should be going forward.

This comes back to this generation being a more reflective generation. We’re really all going through thorough history lessons, in order that the rest of this century isn’t just some repetitive take on what came before. The internet has in a sense been created and excelled at such a fast rate, in order that enough people wake up to the damage that is already done or will continue to be done if at least personal changes are not made.

 

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Hoarding supplements before the Government steps in?

Lately the funk has been set in to place. Buying supplements again, as some sort of mysterious placebo/panacea cure I seek. Something under 10 bucks and that can be bought without a prescription, I’m a sucker every time. A sucker for Acai berry this time, Mind medicine by Pomology, and of course Vitamin D as I might get 15 minutes of sun a day driving into working at 6. I actually have a kind of high right now. I combined the Acai berry, Pomology Mind (b12, dha, folate, acetyl-carnitine, gingko biloba, choline, pomegranate, ashwaganda), and Vitamin D.

It’s almost like I can feel the blood in my brain whizzing around and there’s these small waves breaking, kind of giving my whole head/mind? This warm, tingling sensation – similar to smoking weed, but not as severe. Maybe without the paranoia and anxiety. Brain medicine, Anti-aging medicine, and D for not getting enough sun. I’m pretty sure supplements will evolve to a point where you take only 1 at any given age. Your blood type, DNA, other genetics, will be calculated and assessed when you’re born and a printout will suggest what you might take each year up until let’s say 80. I’ve always been fascinated with supplements and the always pressing question of how much of a placebo they really are or aren’t. Not being a scientist, with test subjects at my beck and call, I can only read random articles that confirm that they do in fact do “something.” Of course I’m not going to gravitate towards the sites that just label most supplements placebo’s, that suckers buy to try and get some perceived upper hand.

I think more likely, I view supplements as a kind of “what if” insurance – similar to those that use religion as a handy insurance plan, a way to make up for all the stuff they avoid in the here and now, for some wishful hereafter. What if these supplements are doing something profound to my body? Calibrating blood cells, killing off free radicals, super charging my libido, and later on in life staving off dementia? I guess we all want to believe in some kind of What if, Insurance heavy concept – And my own insurance revolves around tangible materials that I can use and experiment on myself, rather than dead words from dead people. Ray Kurzweil, the futurist and singularity proponent, may be the extreme with pill popping. (He takes something like 150 per day)

But it’s all really done as a kind of preventative maintenance, a way to give yourself a chance, especially if the government decides to outlaw all health supplements. Now why would the government want to regulate the supplements you take?  Their main argument is rooted in Nanny state rhetoric, as the general public will not do enough of its own research into what they’re putting in their bodies. But this is such an irrelevant argument, as most everybody alive today has the most amount of access to the most exact kind of information, than ever before.

As big Pharma grows and soon takes over Oil as the next booming industry (baby boomers!) you just have to follow the money. Maybe we shouldn’t hoard canned foods, but legit, useful supplements – while they’re still being produced by the private sector.

This is similar to my view on marijuana. I can almost imagine that if pot did become legal, you’d only be able to possess government grown weed, and there would be severe fines for homegrown bud or the variety you already enjoy now. So they would be making billions off of taxes and then the fines and prison sentences for possessing “unregulated” marijuana – a win, win. Plus all of the small growers that would be put out of business if it was legal across the board. It’s hard to say now if this kind of trade-off would be worth it in the long run. Less people drink, smoke more/culture-society loosens up, become less concerned with rah-rah “we’re number 1” rhetoric, defense budget lessens…We can just wait on the fine print “if” it ever does become law.